Intro to HOLND from Hermes Glotz on Vimeo.

THE HISTORY OF LAST NIGHT'S DREAM:
Discovering The Hidden Life of the Soul

This book by Rodger Kamenetz I loved from the cover. Because it’s the History of Last Night's Dream: The Hidden Path to the Soul, and if there’s a hidden path to the soul I want to know what that is. What’s so exciting about this book is that it talks about how there’s a whole other life that we are living when we sleep and that our dreams are there as offerings and gifts to us if we only recognize what the dreams are there to teach us, what they’re there to tell us about our waking lives.—Oprah Winfrey

Now in paperback. AS FEATURED ON OPRAH'S "SOUL SERIES"

Watch or download the webcast of Oprah's interview with Rodger

HOLND interview from Hermes Glotz on Vimeo.

"A STUDY OF THE HUMAN HEART, AND AN APPEAL FOR ITS TRANSFORMATION"-- The CHRISTIAN CENTURY

One of "THE YEAR'S BEST JEWISH BOOKS"--THE JERUSALEM REPORT

For breaking news, tour schedule, or to join the conversation about dreams go to my blog: www.talkingdream.com

For individual dream work, contact  dream(at)kamenetz.com

INTERVIEWS WITH THE AUTHOR

INTERVIEW WITH TIME's DAVID VAN BIEMA

INTERVIEW WITH NEXTBOOK

COAST TO COAST AM INTERVIEWS AUGUST 30, 2008

HOUR ONE: INTERVIEW WITH IAN PUNNETT

HOUR TWO: INTERVIEW AND LISTENER CALLS

HOUR THREE: LISTENER CALLS

NPR AFFILIATE AND CBC RADIO PROGRAMS

THE REAL WORLD OF DREAMING (CBC)

INTERVIEW WITH MARK STEINER WYPR

INTERVIEW WITH DR. DAN GOTTLEIB, WHYY VOICES IN THE FAMILY

Are dreams fantastic nonsense — or ultimate reality?

In his search for the spiritual  truth of dreams, Rodger Kamenetz studies with an 87 year old female kabbalist  in Jerusalem, a suave Tibetan tulku in Copenhagen, and a crusty intuitive archetypal dream master in northern Vermont.

With their guidance, Kamenetz plunges into the world of dreams, and shows how the constant struggle between dream and interpretation has shaped Western thought from Genesis to Freud-- and Jung. This intellectual discovery only marks the threshold of an entire new world of the soul.

By entering fully into his archetypal dreams and taking on their reality, Kamenetz follows a path of increasing depth that leads to three ancient gifts of the dream.

ENDORSEMENTS AND REVIEWS

What would you say if someone told you that all the masterful dream interpreters in history, from the biblical Joseph to the heretical Freud were � well, wrong? That is the jolt delivered by Rodger Kamenetz in this powerful and beautifully written book. Kamenetz is a soul-searcher, quite literally, and we are all better off because of it.

-- STEPHEN J. DUBNER, author of Turbulent Souls, co-author of Freakonomics

Rodger Kamenetz's The History of Last Night's Dream is an enchanting and provocative book exploring a subject with profound implications about our very humanity. As always, Kamenetz writes with intellectual keenness, spiritual longing, and the verbal elegance of a poet. This is a book that has the cumulative effect of our most complex and revealing dreams.

-- ROBERT OLEN BUTLER, Pulitzer Prize Winning author of A Good Scent from a Strange Mountain

For those of us who cherish THE JEW IN THE LOTUS, a new book by Rodger Kamenetz is something to celebrate. He takes us on a wholly beguiling and illuminating night journey through the history of dreams, from Joseph to Freud and far beyond, and he shows us the extraordinary richness of meaning that can be extracted from the common human experience of dreaming. A profound, affecting and deeply rewarding book from a charismatic teacher.

--JONATHAN KIRSCH author of A History of the End of the World

THE HISTORY OF LAST NIGHT'S DREAM reads like a well-paced thriller. I took nourishment from this book. The care and feeding of the soul is hard going these days of spiritual fast food of eveyr kind. In the strip mall of New Age snake oils and cardboard palliatives Kamenetz's book is a square meal. Steeped in erudition, rooted in his own search, Kamenetz has written a manual for living the dream of life through the real dreams of an individual.

--ANDREI CODRESCU, National Public Radio

"Last Night's Dream" is the tale of Kamenetz's attempt to break free by training himself to place dream imagery on an equal footing with text in his quest for a spiritual connection. The book is deeply personal and artfully written; Kamenetz was an established poet before his 1994 classic "The Jew in the Lotus" turned him into a Jewish Renewal celebrity. It is also an accessible primer on the evolving status afforded dreams in Jewish and Western thought and science. Kamenetz represents the best of what the Renewal movement strives for - authenticity of spirit combined with critical thinking. That is why this book will likely receive a lot of attention. Look for it to show up on many a list of the year's best Jewish books.

--IRA RIFKIN, THE JERUSALEM REPORT

Rodger Kamenetz's vividly honest and well-researched book on dreams in Western culture is extraordinary-- in part for its defiance of genre...Before I read it had heard Kamenetz refer to it as a memoir, but it as much an argument for a paradigm shift in dream interpretation. It is also part self-help book and part detective story about the lost dreams of the monotheistic traditions. And none of these categorizations touches on the fact that it is also a study of human heart and an appeal for its transformation.

--Amy Frykholm, THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY

Rodger Kamenetz, author of "The Jew in the Lotus" and "Stalking Elijah," writes in this fascinating book that words, too many words, stand between us and our dreams. We must learn to think in images, the language of dreams. And if we overcome our obsession with interpreting dreams, we can access the truths they offer.

-- LOS ANGELES TIMES

"The History of Last Night's Dream" may well change [your life]. Kamenetz's fierce honesty and unflinching self-revelation inspire both admiration and awe and sympathy and a sense of kinship. We are all dreamers, are we not? This smart, funny, and revolutionary book is filled with compassion for our dreaming minds, for the ways in which they reveal ourselves to ourselves, for the ways our dreams, nighttime or waking, can carry us back to love and so to God.

--SUSAN LARSON, New Orleans Times-Picayune